Blog Entries in 2017

Submitted by Shaun Kittle on Aug 15, 2017
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Schroon Lake is a lot of things. On the surface, it’s a water-studded region that’s ringed by mountains and blanketed in forest. Last week, my wife Anna and I looked a little deeper and discovered it’s also the kind of place that attracts interesting people. By visiting four different places, we heard four different stories from people who love this region. 1. Engaged on Mount SeveranceA trip
Submitted by Pamela Merritt on Aug 03, 2017
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Summer is still happening, and so are events at the Boathouse Theatre. This delightful venue is right on the shores of Schroon Lake. It was once the actual boathouse for Bogle's Hotel, built in 1874. Stub Bogle (I was unable to discover if this was a given name or a nickname, and if so — why?) also operated a business which repaired and rented boats. The boathouse served hotel patrons and the
Submitted by Pamela Merritt on Jul 31, 2017
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Submitted by Guest Blogger: Doug Haney, Co-Director, Cycle Adirondacks[/b] Those familiar with road cycling in the Schroon Lake region know all about the incredible 1-Eye Classic fall tour, the challenge and beauty of the Grand Loop, and, of course, the countless routes that link with Brant Lake’s own “The Hub” bike shop and bar. Yep, the area has all that and then some. But this summer, the “
Submitted by Shaun Kittle on Jul 20, 2017
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Let’s talk about finding a sense of solitude. I’m used to spending my time among the higher peaks of the region. I love the mountains, but so do lots of other people. That’s generally OK, but sometimes I want something different, something that feels more remote. For years I’ve seen the pictures of a place called Pharaoh Lake Wilderness Area. I’ve drooled over the Milky-Way-splashed night sky
Submitted by Pamela Merritt on Jul 20, 2017
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A great motivator to get kids to enjoy hiking is to present a destination. While the view from a mountain peak is a great motivator, it might be too much for younger children. But getting to a pond or a river works just as well. These hikes have other advantages for tiny feet. They have minimal elevation change, possibly smoother trails, and are short enough to let us reach the goal before a